The Lonely Crowd

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I am crowned king of this day’s happiness. Issue 11 of The Lonely Crowd is out and features two of my poems, ‘Brand Street’, and ‘Spider in a Glass’. Both poems owe a debt to StAnza: the former given an examination in Gillian Allnutt’s Masterclass in 2018, and the latter hatched in Patience Agbabi’s workshop in 2017. There’s also work by Abegail Morley, Jonathan Edwards, Francesca Rhydderch, and many others. My thanks to guest editor Glyn Edwards, and to editor John Lavin. Diolch!

 

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Stand

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I first submitted to STAND in 1992, so I’m delighted (and relieved) to crawl between its covers at last. I have five poems from Men Who Repeat Themselves in Volume 17 (2). This volume features Women’s Writing from Singapore, the winners of the inaugural Bi’an Award for UK-Based Chinese Writers, and a host of poets: Dan O’Brien, Rachel Bower, Jenny Johnson, & many more.

 

The Cafe Irreal

I am of goodly cheer tonight because I have five poems at The Cafe Irreal, and they are from a brand new long sequence.

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The Cafe Irreal is edited by G.S. Evans and Alice Whittenburg, and it has been online since 1998. It’s a lovely place to sit and dream. And read.

 

The Moth

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Issue 37 of Ireland’s marvellous literary magazine The Moth has appeared. My poem ‘Men with Tails’ is included, alongside work by Maria Isakova Bennett, Rebecca O’Connor, Niels Hav, and many others. You can read all about the magazine, and subscribe, here.

Gutter 19

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Gutter 19 has arrived, with prose, interviews, reviews, and poems from a fine line-up including Christie Williamson, Sharon Black, me, and so many more. To mark Tom Leonard’s passing, the issue is dedicated to him. I had the enormous good fortune to be a participant in his Saturday morning workshops just before he retired, and this is bang on:

‘We hope that Gutter carries with it some of the spirit of Tom’s work in poetry, politics, language, and humanity. And that those values remain touchstones for Scottish poetry. It is evident already how much poorer we are without his fierce voice.’